Keywords
Last Name
Institution

Pin-Xian Xu

TitleASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
InstitutionMount Sinai
DepartmentGenetics and Genomic Sciences
Address
    Other Positions
    TitleASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
    InstitutionMount Sinai
    DepartmentDevelopmental and Regenerative Biology


     Bibliographic 
     selected publications
    Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
    List All   |   Timeline
    1. Bao S, Zhu L, Zhuang Q, Wang L, Xu PX, Itoh K, Holzman IR, Lin J. Distribution dynamics of recombinant Lactobacillus in the gastrointestinal tract of neonatal rats. PLoS One. 2013; 8(3):e60007.
      View in: PubMed
    2. Sun J, Karoulia Z, Wong EY, Ahmed M, Itoh K, Xu PX. The phosphatase-transcription activator EYA1 is targeted by anaphase-promoting complex/Cdh1 for degradation at M-to-G1 transition. Mol Cell Biol. 2013 Mar; 33(5):927-36.
      View in: PubMed
    3. Rinkevich Y, Mori T, Sahoo D, Xu PX, Bermingham JR, Weissman IL. Identification and prospective isolation of a mesothelial precursor lineage giving rise to smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts for mammalian internal organs, and their vasculature. Nat Cell Biol. 2012 Dec; 14(12):1251-60.
      View in: PubMed
    4. Wong EY, Ahmed M, Xu PX. EYA1-SIX1 complex in neurosensory cell fate induction in the mammalian inner ear. Hear Res. 2013 Mar; 297:13-9.
      View in: PubMed
    5. Xu PX. The EYA-SO/SIX complex in development and disease. Pediatr Nephrol. 2013 Jun; 28(6):843-54.
      View in: PubMed
    6. Ahmed M, Xu J, Xu PX. EYA1 and SIX1 drive the neuronal developmental program in cooperation with the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex and SOX2 in the mammalian inner ear. Development. 2012 Jun; 139(11):1965-77.
      View in: PubMed
    7. Ahmed M, Wong EY, Sun J, Xu J, Wang F, Xu PX. Eya1-Six1 interaction is sufficient to induce hair cell fate in the cochlea by activating Atoh1 expression in cooperation with Sox2. Dev Cell. 2012 Feb 14; 22(2):377-90.
      View in: PubMed
    8. Nie X, Xu J, El-Hashash A, Xu PX. Six1 regulates Grem1 expression in the metanephric mesenchyme to initiate branching morphogenesis. Dev Biol. 2011 Apr 1; 352(1):141-51.
      View in: PubMed
    9. Sun J, Tang T, Duan J, Xu PX, Wang Z, Zhang Y, Wu L, Li Y. Biocompatibility of bacterial magnetosomes: acute toxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. Nanotoxicology. 2010 Sep; 4(3):271-83.
      View in: PubMed
    10. Nie X, Sun J, Gordon RE, Cai CL, Xu PX. SIX1 acts synergistically with TBX18 in mediating ureteral smooth muscle formation. Development. 2010 Mar; 137(5):755-65.
      View in: PubMed
    11. Chen B, Kim EH, Xu PX. Initiation of olfactory placode development and neurogenesis is blocked in mice lacking both Six1 and Six4. Dev Biol. 2009 Feb 1; 326(1):75-85.
      View in: PubMed
    12. Zou D, Erickson C, Kim EH, Jin D, Fritzsch B, Xu PX. Eya1 gene dosage critically affects the development of sensory epithelia in the mammalian inner ear. Hum Mol Genet. 2008 Nov 1; 17(21):3340-56.
      View in: PubMed
    13. Hoskins BE, Cramer CH, Silvius D, Zou D, Raymond RM, Orten DJ, Kimberling WJ, Smith RJ, Weil D, Petit C, Otto EA, Xu PX, Hildebrandt F. Transcription factor SIX5 is mutated in patients with branchio-oto-renal syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Apr; 80(4):800-4.
      View in: PubMed
    14. Grifone R, Demignon J, Giordani J, Niro C, Souil E, Bertin F, Laclef C, Xu PX, Maire P. Eya1 and Eya2 proteins are required for hypaxial somitic myogenesis in the mouse embryo. Dev Biol. 2007 Feb 15; 302(2):602-16.
      View in: PubMed
    15. Zou D, Silvius D, Rodrigo-Blomqvist S, Enerbäck S, Xu PX. Eya1 regulates the growth of otic epithelium and interacts with Pax2 during the development of all sensory areas in the inner ear. Dev Biol. 2006 Oct 15; 298(2):430-41.
      View in: PubMed
    16. Zou D, Silvius D, Davenport J, Grifone R, Maire P, Xu PX. Patterning of the third pharyngeal pouch into thymus/parathyroid by Six and Eya1. Dev Biol. 2006 May 15; 293(2):499-512.
      View in: PubMed
    17. Sajithlal G, Zou D, Silvius D, Xu PX. Eya 1 acts as a critical regulator for specifying the metanephric mesenchyme. Dev Biol. 2005 Aug 15; 284(2):323-36.
      View in: PubMed
    18. Zou D, Silvius D, Fritzsch B, Xu PX. Eya1 and Six1 are essential for early steps of sensory neurogenesis in mammalian cranial placodes. Development. 2004 Nov; 131(22):5561-72.
      View in: PubMed
    19. Grifone R, Laclef C, Spitz F, Lopez S, Demignon J, Guidotti JE, Kawakami K, Xu PX, Kelly R, Petrof BJ, Daegelen D, Concordet JP, Maire P. Six1 and Eya1 expression can reprogram adult muscle from the slow-twitch phenotype into the fast-twitch phenotype. Mol Cell Biol. 2004 Jul; 24(14):6253-67.
      View in: PubMed
    20. Ruf RG, Xu PX, Silvius D, Otto EA, Beekmann F, Muerb UT, Kumar S, Neuhaus TJ, Kemper MJ, Raymond RM, Brophy PD, Berkman J, Gattas M, Hyland V, Ruf EM, Schwartz C, Chang EH, Smith RJ, Stratakis CA, Weil D, Petit C, Hildebrandt F. SIX1 mutations cause branchio-oto-renal syndrome by disruption of EYA1-SIX1-DNA complexes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 May 25; 101(21):8090-5.
      View in: PubMed
    21. Zheng W, Huang L, Wei ZB, Silvius D, Tang B, Xu PX. The role of Six1 in mammalian auditory system development. Development. 2003 Sep; 130(17):3989-4000.
      View in: PubMed
    22. Xu PX, Zheng W, Huang L, Maire P, Laclef C, Silvius D. Six1 is required for the early organogenesis of mammalian kidney. Development. 2003 Jul; 130(14):3085-94.
      View in: PubMed
    23. Xu PX, Zheng W, Laclef C, Maire P, Maas RL, Peters H, Xu X. Eya1 is required for the morphogenesis of mammalian thymus, parathyroid and thyroid. Development. 2002 Jul; 129(13):3033-44.
      View in: PubMed
    Xu's Networks
    Click the "See All" links for more information and interactive visualizations!
    Concepts
    _
    Co-Authors
    _
    Similar People
    _
    Same Department
     
    Mount Sinai Profiles is managed by Conduits - The Institutes for Translational Sciences at Icahn School of Medicine, supported by the National Center for Research Resources and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health through Grant Number UL1TR000067